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  • Rida translates for the London office

    Every fortnight, the SustainAbility London office invites practitioners from within our network to speak to our team over lunch and share insights from both their own work and on what’s next on the sustainability landscape.

    SustainAbility was pleased to host Mumtaz Shaikh, alum of the Quest Fellowship Programme in our office last week to discuss the impactful work she has been doing for over a decade on empowering women in marginalised communities in Mumbai, India. She was recently awarded the Daughter of Maharashtra award in recognition of her services to the cause of gender equality.

    Mumtaz’s journey into activism and advocacy began when she joined a Committee of Resource Organisations (CORO) meeting over a decade ago, lending her voice to issues affecting women in her community. She is a strong believer in grass-roots level mobilisation for finding solutions to local problems. Having had personal experience with issues such as gender-based discrimination and domestic violence, she understood that right to dignity and easy access to public services for women were absolutely critical for women’s empowerment in her community.

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  • Flickr image by Bill Keaggy

    From economists to politicians, from consumers to scientists, plenty of people agree that the current approach of many businesses is not sustainable.

    We’ve talked about the sheer obviousness of this point, as have many other thinkers and doers working on this challenge. But when it comes to discussing this with people responsible for key decision within these companies, it is frankly a bit awkward. Even for consultants like us who are engaged specifically to talk about this stuff, it doesn’t always feel okay to come right out and say it.

    We can discuss the most material issues, engage diverse stakeholders, or develop ambitious goals, all with the intent of nudging decisions in the right direction. But rarely do we come right out and say: Enough already. If significant talent and money at this company aren’t directed towards addressing the challenge and adapting, we’re not going to make it.

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  • An increasing number of workplaces are embracing future fit practices including flexible working and benefits for employees. © iStockphoto

    For over 25 years, companies have valued our ability to serve as their early warning system—to interpret emerging issues and trends in the sustainable development agenda and help them anticipate, understand, and respond to shifts in the business landscape. Our Ten Trends for 2015 series distills SustainAbility’s thinking over the past year and forecasts the issues that will shape the sustainable development agenda in 2015. This is the first in our series of blogs expanding upon these trends.

    Several developments last year—such as calls for banning zero-hours contracts in the UK, the escalation of the living wage issue in the US, UK, and parts of Asia, and initiatives by corporates to address root causes of inequality—have brought into sharper focus the question: What does the workplace—when it’s fit for the future—look like?

    The reality of an ageing workforce in developed economies is profoundly shifting how businesses reconfigure working practices and accommodate a multi-generational workforce. McDonald’s has warned that Europe faces a future of stunted growth unless employers take measures to bring young people and older workers into the labour force. Several companies that have focused on adapting their business practices to accommodate older workers are seeing financial returns and productivity gains. For example, since retailer B&Q began actively recruiting store clerks over the age of 50, its staff turnover is six times lower, while short-term absenteeism has decreased by 39%. Unilever UK estimates that it gains six euros in productivity for every one euro spent on a wellness program designed to prolong the working life of its older employees. …

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  • Flickr image by Wayne Wilkinson

    Labels can be tricky and distracting things. “Corporate citizenship,” “corporate social responsibility,” “shared value,” “triple bottom line,” “sustainable development,” and “sustainability” are just a few of the terms used by the broad array of professionals nudging business to play a positive role in society.

    It may seem a bit tenuous for someone in the full-time employ of an organization called “SustainAbility” to make such a pronouncement, but in keeping with the rose-by-any-other-name-would-smell-as-sweet philosophy, I suggest the discussion about labels be set aside for good and that 2015 be embraced as the year of The Obvious.

    It is obvious, for example, that soiling your home—literally the dwelling in which you live, or figuratively the community from which you and others draw water, breathe air, produce food, and go about day-to-day life—with toxic substances that can quickly or slowly kill you is, well, a pretty bad idea. …

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  • Flickr image by andres musta

    This piece was originally published in the autumn issue of Radar Magazine – Issue 05: Unusual Activists.

    Global human rights violations have risen in the last decade and unless governments act to introduce stronger binding mechanisms and companies start viewing human rights compliance as an essential part of corporate accountability, progress on human rights will remain slow. …

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  • Solar energy generation is gaining momentum. Image courtesy of University of Saskatchewan Flickr.

    Between traditional news channels, blogs, and social media, it can be hard to keep up with what’s making waves in the field of sustainable development. In this roundup we aim to cut through the noise with a handful of highlights that have caught our eye.

    Improving Transparency to Tackle Corruption

    Transparency International’s latest report, Transparency in Corporate Reporting: Assessing Emerging Market Multinationals, evaluates the reporting practices of 100 companies in emerging economies including China, India and Brazil. The companies assessed in the study achieved an average score of 46% in reporting on their anti-corruption programmes with Chinese companies achieving the lowest scores….

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  • Prominent business sources have been making the business case for equal marriage rights on both sides of the Atlantic.

    Between traditional news channels, blogs, and social media, it can be hard to keep up with what’s making waves in the field of sustainable development. In this roundup we aim to cut through the noise with a handful of highlights that have caught our eye.

    The Business Case for Gay Marriage

    John Browne, former CEO of BP wrote a piece in the Financial Times expressing his support for gay marriage in the UK, framing the argument in economic terms: “Anything that fosters an inclusive environment makes good business sense.” He contended that gay marriage will “eliminate one more barrier to a true corporate meritocracy and deserves recognition as a matter of strategic importance in the global market for talent.”…

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  • Last week we heard Clive Bloom – Emeritus Professor of English and American Studies at Middlesex University and author of Violent London: 2000 Years of Riots, Rebels and Revolts – _commenting on BBC Radio 4 about the systemic issues that underpinned the devastating riots in London this month. With many now searching for an explanation of the sudden and surprising violence that spread across London and other parts of the UK, Bloom argues that sociological factors – chiefly endemic poverty and the alienation of consumer culture – are the real culprits, and further, that failing to address the fundamental issues and resentments of the communities that spawned the riots will only guarantee their repetition. The point is essential as we face the likelihood of wider and more frequent social disruption in response to economic, social and environmental stresses in the decades ahead.

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  • Kentucky on My Mind

    28 Feb 2011Mark Lee

    Externalities abound, but perhaps nowhere more so than with coal. Let's hope decision-makers are poised to act.

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  • While Qatar is admittedly one of the riskiest World Cup selections ever, it’s also one of the most important.

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  • Here’s how I would describe where we think companies should go with their sustainability reporting...

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  • This issue brief explores ways in which companies that displace can ensure the rights of the displaced are respected.

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  • Had breakfast this morning with Frances Cairncross, now Rector of Exeter College, Oxford...

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