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  • Flickr image by SecretLondon123

    Not many of us saw that coming did we?! I’m referring, of course, to the extraordinary outcome of last week’s UK election. As I write, David Cameron is making the finishing touches to his new government that, naturally, is claiming a mandate for its policy portfolio. Will we see the sustainability agenda figure highly in this portfolio?

    This was an extraordinary election for many reasons; not least that 3.9 million people voted for UKIP – not to be glossed over, but not a topic for this piece. Of more interest here is that over a million people voted for the Green Party. Is this the beginning of a “green political revolution”? I wish it were so, but sadly I doubt it.

    For some years, I have wondered whether our broad range of sustainability concerns adds up to a full political agenda. Or rather, should we be campaigning for those sustainability issues to be addressed across the political spectrum? Indeed, some people turned this question into a criticism of the Greens: that they were more “campaigning group” than “party.”

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  • John Elkington at the SustainAbility London office

    The SustainAbility London office regularly invites practitioners from within our network to speak to the team over lunch to share insights from their own work as well as their perspective on the sustainability landscape at large.

    SustainAbility was pleased to host John Elkington, Co-Founder and Honorary Chairman of SustainAbility, and the Volans team to discuss their latest publication The Stretch Agenda, a report intended as a playful provocation to big business to redefine the future of leadership in the Breakthrough Decade from 2016 to 2025.

    The Stretch Agenda is a dramatised portrayal of conversations that are already taking place in boardrooms across the Global C-suite. The piece in written as a “playper,” as opposed to a traditional report format, to provide fresh voices and perspectives on the sustainability agenda from the point of view of top decision-makers and strategists within a fictitious global company, ‘MN-Co’. The reader is given insight via a discussion between the Chair, CEO, CFO, CHRO, CMO and an incoming CXO (Chief Sustainability/Stretch Officer) and two young leaders as they ponder how to shift their company’s business model to address the economic, social and environmental challenges that lie ahead.

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  • Adrian Henriques in the SustainAbility London office

    The SustainAbility London office regularly invites practitioners from within our network to speak to the team over lunch to share insights from their own work as well as their perspective on the sustainability landscape at large.

    We were delighted to welcome Adrian Henriques, independent adviser on corporate transparency, public sector accountability, and civil society development. Adrian is an experienced sustainability professional with more than 15 years in the field. He independently researches and advises both the private and public sectors – for the likes of M&S, Camelot, GRI and social enterprises – and is a Visiting Professor of Accountability and CSR at Middlesex University Business School.

    With a long career in sustainability and the accountability agenda, we were interested to hear Adrian’s perspective that “optimism is quite dangerous” in regards to the evolution of corporate sustainability and CSR over the last 15 years. Below are the highlights from our discussion.

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  • Flickr image by fauxto_digit

    SustainAbility’s recently released research See Change: How Transparency Drives Performance proposes a solution to the stalled state of sustainability reporting and transparency. See Change highlights three key elements that must be addressed in order to gain the most value from transparency and reporting efforts: materiality, valuation of externalities and integration. This is the last in a three-part series that explores those elements.

    Earlier in this series we explored how materiality and the valuation of externalities enable companies to focus their transparency efforts and leverage the value of sustainability reporting. This final article discusses how companies can apply materiality and externalities valuation to integrate sustainability across the business.

    True integration of sustainability means that material issues effectively are addressed within business functions and seen as critical to the company’s viability. Integration enables companies to understand internally, and — where relevant — communicate externally, how they create value and to better manage performance on critical issues.

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  • Is CSR really dead?

    Prognoses and Prognostications
    As 2014 closed and 2015 began, there were numerous “top,” “best” and “most important” lists marking notable 2014 occurrences and forecasting what to expect in 2015. SustainAbility entered these sweepstakes with our 10 Trends for 2015, which distills our thinking from the past year and predicts the issues that will shape the sustainable development agenda in the 12 months ahead.

    Our 10 select issues include – as headlines and subtext – global warming and climate activism, water, marketplace disruption, business model innovation, workforce diversity, ongoing efforts to eradicate slavery and more. The breadth of topics illustrates how varied this field has become and hints at the complexity any organisation faces in terms of managing such numerous and disparate issues well. …

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  • When you work in the corporate world you end up using a lot of jargon. Jargon encourages a type of tribalism and recent studies have shown that employees are far less likely to be engaged with a company’s mission when jargon is rife.

    SustainAbility has joined forces with the All Purpose Research Institute Ltd and the Fair Oratory Organization Ltd to research the use of jargon and acronyms in the workplace. The results showed that almost half of all employees found jargon to be extremely frustrating. “It negatively impacts the operational potential of blue sky discussions and outputs,” says Jo Mumbo, Head of Communications at the All Purpose Research Institute Ltd. “We need to ensure we stop chasing butterflies and take forward more clear-water dialogues that better identify primary engagement touch points with our clients and stakeholders.”

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  • The roles of materiality, externalities, and integration in See Change's infographic

    This piece was originally published in the spring issue of Radar Magazine – Issue 06: The Place of Sustainability.

    Information is powerful. In our report See Change: How Transparency Drives Performance we found that sharing the right information in the right way with stakeholders can improve companies’ decision-making and drive change. Transparency on how a business generates value (for the economy, society, and the environment) can explain to stakeholders what impacts – both positive and negative – a company has, which material issues are most important, and where business opportunities may lie.

    We’re beginning to see more companies include business model diagrams on websites and in their sustainability and annual reports. This is in part driven by guidance provided by the IIRC’s Integrated Reporting Framework, which advises companies to describe the ways in which they create value. The Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB) is also encouraging US companies to consider their business models as it includes ‘Business Models & Innovation’ as one of the ESG issues it has included in the standards it is developing. Companies like Novelis, Fibria, Natura, Astra Zeneca, Unilever, and Mitsubishi are including business model illustrations in their reports to help explain their priority issues and performance. …

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  • Hemma Varma, Senior CSR Manager Europe at Marriott Hotels, at the SustainAbility office

    The SustainAbility London office regularly invites practitioners from within our network to speak to the team over lunch to share insights from both their own work and on the sustainability landscape at large.

    We were delighted to have Hemma Varma, Senior CSR Manager Europe at Marriott come in to talk to us about their sustainability strategy. Hemma’s focus is on managing partnerships with charities and advocacy groups, driving employee engagement and supporting Marriott’s 20/20 youth vision. With 350,000 staff worldwide and hotels in over 72 countries, the depth and diversity of sustainability issues that Marriott faces are vast, touching practically every facet of the corporate social responsibility spectrum.

    Beginning as a family run business in 1927, Marriott has always stuck to its roots, placing great importance on community engagement and adopting the view that what it takes from the community, especially in terms of employees, it should give back. The founder’s philosophy, “Take care of our associates and they will take care of the customers” is now a widely accepted way of thinking in business but Marriott was embracing this value long before the terms ‘CSR’ or ‘employee engagement’ even existed. …

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  • Image © CC Paul Lowry

    For over 25 years, companies have valued our ability to serve as their early warning system—to interpret emerging issues and trends in the sustainable development agenda and help them anticipate, understand, and respond to shifts in the business landscape. Our Ten Trends for 2015 series distills SustainAbility’s thinking over the past year and forecasts the issues that will shape the sustainable development agenda in 2015. This is the fourth in our series of blogs expanding upon these trends.

    One of the biggest stories of 2014 was uncertainty across the energy sector, which is set to continue throughout 2015, a seminal year in the transition towards a sustainable global energy future due to the Paris climate negotiations in December 2015. Price volatility coupled with record gains in renewable energy provision, the rise of divestment from fossil fuel companies, and growing momentum for real emissions reductions is placing pressure on society to act quickly in the fight against climate change. No actor is more impacted by these changes than fossil fuel companies. The time has arrived for them to engage constructively around the provision of energy under emissions constraints and recognize their new role in society. …

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  • Flickr image by Bill Gracey

    For over 25 years, companies have valued our ability to serve as their early warning system—to interpret emerging issues and trends in the sustainable development agenda and help them anticipate, understand, and respond to shifts in the business landscape. Our Ten Trends for 2015 series distills SustainAbility’s thinking over the past year and forecasts the issues that will shape the sustainable development agenda in 2015. This is the third in our series of blogs expanding upon these trends.

    Earlier this year SustainAbility identified global water stress, water demands that exceed water availability, as one of ten key sustainability trends for 2015—both as a supply chain risk for companies as well as an issue of political and economic significance to countries. In the trends summary, we highlighted the World Economic Forum’s identification of “water crises” as one of the top ten issues of greatest concern to the global economy in 2015. Just a few months into 2015 and with World Water Day approaching this Sunday, March 22, it’s evident that the global water crisis is indeed a critical issue with extreme water stress in Sao Paulo, Brazil and across California as just two examples.

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  • The SustainAbility team, around the world!

    In the spirit of Radar’s spring issue, The Place of Sustainability, we feature some of the recent travels of the SustainAbility team. They bring us a first-hand view of Bhutan, Sri Lanka, Brazil, Indonesia and India and a snapshot of some of the issues that currently define these diverse countries.

    Bhutan, Denise Delaney
    The Kingdom of Bhutan – or the Land of the Thunder Dragon – is sandwiched between China and Nepal with a population of three-quarters of a million people. Bhutan intrigues. There are no traffic lights. There is effectively no advertising. You will not find the outlet of a single, large multi-national company. The pursuit of happiness is the country’s greatest export.

    Gross National Happiness (GNH) measures and supports Bhutanese society across nine domains, and builds on its original four pillars of happiness: sustainable and equitable socio-economic development, environmental conservation, the preservation and promotion of culture, and good governance. Whether or not GNH will prove an effective alternative to GDP or other measures, what one of the GNH co-authors, Karma Ura, says of GNH resonated quite strongly with me: …

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  • Rida translates for the London office

    Every fortnight, the SustainAbility London office invites practitioners from within our network to speak to our team over lunch and share insights from both their own work and on what’s next on the sustainability landscape.

    SustainAbility was pleased to host Mumtaz Shaikh, alum of the Quest Fellowship Programme in our office last week to discuss the impactful work she has been doing for over a decade on empowering women in marginalised communities in Mumbai, India. She was recently awarded the Daughter of Maharashtra award in recognition of her services to the cause of gender equality.

    Mumtaz’s journey into activism and advocacy began when she joined a Committee of Resource Organisations (CORO) meeting over a decade ago, lending her voice to issues affecting women in her community. She is a strong believer in grass-roots level mobilisation for finding solutions to local problems. Having had personal experience with issues such as gender-based discrimination and domestic violence, she understood that right to dignity and easy access to public services for women were absolutely critical for women’s empowerment in her community.

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  • Environmental economist Pavan Sukhdev

    This piece was originally published in the spring issue of Radar Magazine – Issue 06: The Place of Sustainability.

    SustainAbility is pleased to shine a spotlight on the work of environmental economist Pavan Sukhdev, CEO of GIST Advisory, an environmental consulting firm focused on enabling governments and corporations to measure and manage their impacts on natural and human capital. At the end of 2014 he joined our Engaging Stakeholders workshops to share his knowledge on the importance of, and emerging methodologies in, valuing externalities, including social, environmental and financial impacts.

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  • Froosh's Fruit Farm Programme in action

    This piece was originally published in the spring issue of Radar Magazine – Issue 06: The Place of Sustainability.

    Anna Hagemann Rise, Froosh Group Communications and CSR manager, interviewed for a different role but within minutes she and the CEO were talking politics and it ended with him asking if she would like to run the Fruit Farm Programme. She talked to Zoë Arden about the fruit smoothie company’s connections with the countries from which it sources.

    Zoë Arden: What is the Fruit Farm Programme and what does it mean for Froosh?

    Anna Hagemann Rise: A couple of years ago, the Fruit Farm Programme was a side project. Now it’s something that all the countries that we operate in want to be involved and I’ve spent the last two years building the programme to bring Froosh’s staff to the farms where our fruit is grown. In 2014, we did seven trips, and we have 11 planned for 2015. I invite media, customers, and people in the public sphere who share our values. It’s not just about trips but to build the political message. I also present once a week at either a conference or a university, explaining the political mission of the company – trade not aid. …

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  • Flickr image by Brent Flanders

    Our recently released research See Change: How Transparency Drives Performance proposes a solution to the stalled state of sustainability reporting and transparency. See Change highlights three key elements that must be addressed in order to gain the most value from transparency and reporting efforts: materiality, valuation of externalities and integration. This is the second in a three-part series, which was originally published on GreenBiz, to explore those elements.

    In the first article in this series, we explored how materiality enables companies to focus their transparency efforts and leverage the value of sustainability reporting. The second important element of transparency is valuation of externalities. After identifying and prioritizing the most material issues, companies should account for externalities: the unintended indirect consequences associated with an economic activity for which the costs have not been accounted.

    Valuing externalities, such as the full cost of GHG emissions or the upstream environmental benefits of choosing a recycled material, allows a company to understand and present a comprehensive picture of its role in society and the environment. …

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  • Apple CEO Tim Cook's public coming out in 2014 highlighted the issue of LBGT workplace discrimination. Image © CC Mike Deerkoski

    For over 25 years, companies have valued our ability to serve as their early warning system—to interpret emerging issues and trends in the sustainable development agenda and help them anticipate, understand, and respond to shifts in the business landscape. Our Ten Trends for 2015 series distills SustainAbility’s thinking over the past year and forecasts the issues that will shape the sustainable development agenda in 2015. This is the second in our series of blogs expanding upon these trends.

    While gender diversity continues to frame the narrative on diversity within a company’s workforce, stakeholders and companies are shifting their focus to more holistic interpretation. This includes fostering other dimensions of inclusion such as race, ethnicity, sexual orientation and disabilities.

    In 2014 a number of tech companies including Yahoo, Google, Facebook, Twitter and Amazon publicly disclosed their diversity figures, bringing attention to the underrepresentation of women and ethnic minorities in the industry. While the tech industry has lagged behind other industries on the diversity front, the rise in disclosure of diversity data by these companies signals that, beyond examining their environmental and social impacts, these companies may be turning an inward lens onto their own workforce. A recent article in the Harvard Business Review posits that with various reporting frameworks and guidelines promoting improved non-financial reporting, significant insights will come from human capital reporting to provide investors and regulators with information on how companies create value over time. …

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  • Flickr image by Bill Keaggy

    From economists to politicians, from consumers to scientists, plenty of people agree that the current approach of many businesses is not sustainable.

    We’ve talked about the sheer obviousness of this point, as have many other thinkers and doers working on this challenge. But when it comes to discussing this with people responsible for key decision within these companies, it is frankly a bit awkward. Even for consultants like us who are engaged specifically to talk about this stuff, it doesn’t always feel okay to come right out and say it.

    We can discuss the most material issues, engage diverse stakeholders, or develop ambitious goals, all with the intent of nudging decisions in the right direction. But rarely do we come right out and say: Enough already. If significant talent and money at this company aren’t directed towards addressing the challenge and adapting, we’re not going to make it.

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  • An increasing number of workplaces are embracing future fit practices including flexible working and benefits for employees. © iStockphoto

    For over 25 years, companies have valued our ability to serve as their early warning system—to interpret emerging issues and trends in the sustainable development agenda and help them anticipate, understand, and respond to shifts in the business landscape. Our Ten Trends for 2015 series distills SustainAbility’s thinking over the past year and forecasts the issues that will shape the sustainable development agenda in 2015. This is the first in our series of blogs expanding upon these trends.

    Several developments last year—such as calls for banning zero-hours contracts in the UK, the escalation of the living wage issue in the US, UK, and parts of Asia, and initiatives by corporates to address root causes of inequality—have brought into sharper focus the question: What does the workplace—when it’s fit for the future—look like?

    The reality of an ageing workforce in developed economies is profoundly shifting how businesses reconfigure working practices and accommodate a multi-generational workforce. McDonald’s has warned that Europe faces a future of stunted growth unless employers take measures to bring young people and older workers into the labour force. Several companies that have focused on adapting their business practices to accommodate older workers are seeing financial returns and productivity gains. For example, since retailer B&Q began actively recruiting store clerks over the age of 50, its staff turnover is six times lower, while short-term absenteeism has decreased by 39%. Unilever UK estimates that it gains six euros in productivity for every one euro spent on a wellness program designed to prolong the working life of its older employees. …

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  • Flickr image by Greg Foster

    SustainAbility’s recently released research, See Change: How Transparency Drives Performance, proposes a solution to the somewhat stalled state of sustainability reporting and transparency. “See Change” highlights three key elements that must be addressed in order to gain the most value from transparency and reporting efforts: materiality; valuation of externalities; and integration. What follows is the first of a three-part series that will explore those elements.

    Most sustainability reports contain vast quantities of information about a company’s environmental and social impacts. While this generally means an increase in transparency, it also has led to lengthy, costly and minimally read reports. The resources devoted to gathering data and creating narratives ultimately are not bringing enough value to companies and their stakeholders. How can we improve these reporting efforts and ensure that the powerful data and narratives in these reports are leveraged to inform decisions? …

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  • Image © 38 Degrees

    This piece was originally published in the autumn issue of Radar Magazine – Issue 05: Unusual Activists.

    38 Degrees is one of the UK’s biggest campaigning communities, with over
    2.5 million members. Members link up online and offline to discuss and vote on which issues the organisation campaigns on together. Zoë Arden talked to Maddy Carroll, Director of Campaigns at 38 Degrees, about the rise of ‘people-powered’ movements.

    Zoë Arden: Can you tell me about how the organisation started?

    Maddy Carroll: 38 Degrees started in 2009 when the political establishment kept talking about widespread apathy amongst the British public. But the public wasn’t losing interest in politics, they were losing faith in politicians; they still cared very much about the issues. 38 Degrees came out of a model of campaigning that started in America with an organisation called MoveOn bringing large numbers of people together to campaign on issues they care about.

    The ‘Stop Forest Sell-Off Campaign’ that started in 2010 was a very big moment for 38 Degrees. It was a campaign that really went to the heart of so many people in the country – preventing the sale of national forests to private companies. …

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